Mental health

Types of support

Help and support is available to help you cope with mental health problems.

Treatment may include self-help, talking therapies, medication and – if necessary – 24-hour support, which may take place at home or in hospital.

Talking therapy

Talking therapy involves talking to someone who is trained to help you deal with your negative feelings. They can help anyone who is experiencing distress.

Talking therapy is provided locally by Inclusion Thurrock. The service is available throughout the borough and is designed to help you cope with common mental health problems such as depression and anxiety. Anyone aged 18 or over can ask for this service, or a health professional such as your GP can ask for you. You can find out more at NHS: benefits of talking therapy.

Medicines

If you and your GP agree you would benefit from medication, there are options that can help with conditions such as anxiety, depression, insomnia, mania and other mental health problems.

Taking medication for your mental health is no different to taking antibiotics for a disease, and it does not necessarily mean you will be taking them for the rest of your life.

Side-effects for most medication – such as antidepressants – usually only last for the first 2 weeks, so always try and stick to your prescription and make sure you discuss any concerns with your GP or specialist care provider. You can find out more at NHS: antidepressants.

Peer support

Inclusion Thurrock – together with Thurrock Mind – runs Thurrock Recovery College, which offers courses to help residents better understand how to stay well.

Courses are open to all but are particularly beneficial to those experiencing low mood or depression. They cover topics such as staying well, food and mood, caring for carers, understanding depression and understanding anxiety.

The courses are partly produced and presented by people known as 'Peer Trainers', who have personally experienced mental health issues.

Care Programme Approach (CPA) for mental health problems

The Care Programme Approach (CPA) is a package of care for people with mental health problems – NHS: care for people with mental health problems

If you are receiving Care Programme Approach (CPA) support, your Care Co-ordinator – the main person who currently helps you – should give you detailed information on how to get in touch with the mental health services when you need them. If it's urgent, try contacting your Care Co-ordinator or ask to be put through to the Duty Practitioner in the Community Mental Health Team.

If you are receiving care but not CPA support, your named case worker should give you details of how to get in touch with the mental health services you need. If it's urgent, try contacting your named case worker or ask to be put through to the Duty Practitioner in the Community Mental Health Team.

Support from other organisations

Support is also available from: